QuickFire provided blasts of information and a CME opportunity

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MSSC-QuickFire-V2MSSC members had the chance to learn about the latest prostate cancer recommendations, robotic surgery in joint replacement, colonoscopy and cervical cancer screening, KUSM-Wichita’s new curriculum and other topics during the May 2 membership meeting, which was in the fast-moving QuickFire format.

The meeting also allowed attendees to earn up to two CME credits, granted through the MSSC. Members also heard from and met new Executive Director Phillip Brownlee, whose appointment the MSSC had been announced the week before.

Urologist Dr. Jeffrey S. Davis discussed prostate cancer recommendations and strove to clarify misconceptions about PSA testing.

Urologist Dr. Jeffrey S. Davis discussed prostate cancer recommendations and strove to clarify misconceptions about PSA testing.

“It’s a great privilege to join this group that I’ve admired for so long,” Brownlee said. “Thank you for this honor.”

The meeting, held at the Wichita Marriott, then moved into its educational component: seven approximately 15-minute presentations allowing MSSC members to share their interests and expertise and then take questions from the audience. The topics:

Prostate cancer: New task force recommendations. Noting that prostate cancer is “still the No. 2 killer for men,” Dr. Jeffrey S. Davis gave a quick history of shifting guidelines and sometimes-confusing PSA tests. Contrary to some recommendations, he said, urologists believe screening is beneficial because it has reduced deaths. Physicians need to better educate men that PSA tests – while not perfect – are safe and don’t cause dysfunction, he said.

Collaborative practice agreements. Dr. Justin Moore, medical director of Health ICT, the program to reduce obesity, diabetes, heart disease and stroke, described the formal agreements between pharmacists and physicians. By allowing pharmacists to handle drug management, particularly for chronic diseases, physicians could spend more time with patients and increase job satisfaction, said Dr. Moore, who offered Health ICT’s assistance in setting up the agreements.

Robotic-arm assisted technology in joint replacement: Orthopaedic surgeon Dr. Damion Walker described how he and colleagues are using robotic surgery in full and partial joint replacements, especially knees and hips. The tools provide greater precision, more readily accommodate the highly individual anatomy of joints, and speed recovery. “What’s telling is people’s bounce-back,” he said. “They get up and go. It’s a different recovery.”

Cervical cancer screening update: Dr. Randall Morgan recounted recommendations for screening: Pap smears for women under 30 every three years, HPV testing and a Pap smear every five years for those 30 to 65, and no testing after 65 unless there are risk factors. The HPV test, he said, has been shown to more accurately assess cancer risk. One challenge, an audience member said, is convincing 65-plus women that testing is no longer necessary.

KU School of Medicine’s new ACE curriculum. The curriculum that will be phased in starting this summer involves more active learning and less lecture time, said Dr. Scott Moser, associate dean. The goal is to begin the clinical part of their education sooner, and end the “binge and purge” of knowledge in the current approach. He told how courses will be eight weeks, followed by electives or, if the student requires, remediation to help them master material then instead of waiting until later. Dr. Moser said the approach provides plenty of chances for physicians to help students build skills. Email smoser@kumc.edu if interested.

Surgeon Dr. Lindsay Strader explained colonoscopy screening guidelines and, like other presenters, answered questions.

Surgeon Dr. Lindsay Strader explained colonoscopy screening guidelines and, like other presenters, answered questions.

Colonoscopy screening guidelines especially for high-risk patients/genetic syndromes. Dr. Lindsay Strader noted that 135,000 cases of colorectal cancer occur each year, with a quarter of those clustered in families. People with heightened genetic risk, such as Lynch syndrome and FAP, require special attention and screening, she said. The cancer risks point out that “we need to do a better job of taking family histories.”

Stick, Slick & Wick – Unique use of common products in the wound center. The tool kit for wound care is immense, Dr. Marilee McBoyle said, and she chose three particularly interesting ones: Medihoney, a medical grade honey that cleans wounds and lifts tissue; amniotic membranes that help close wounds and reduce scars; and moisture-wicking fabrics – much like Under Armour athletic wear – that help with skin-to-skin contact issues.

Dr. McBoyle, presenting last, also made an observation that reflects why QuickFire has become a tradition: “The breadth of the topics we’ve heard tonight is impressive.”